Here you will find all the terminology that get’s used in your Google Analytics reports. We will keep this list updated.

Sessions: Measured by the time a user is active on your website or app. A new session gets counted when a user is inactive for 30 minutes or more. Any interaction within the 30 minutes, even if the user leaves the website and comes back, will count towards the original session.

Users: This metrics show how many users viewed or interacted with your site/app.

% New Sessions: Indicates the percentage of new sessions over a defined period of time.

Bounce Rate: The percentage of single-page sessions where users left the same page they entered, without interacting with the page.

Pageviews: Gets counted when a page is loaded or reloaded in a browser. It's a metric defined as the total number of pages viewed.

Pages/session: The average number of pages viewed per session.

Avg Sess. Duration: The average amount of time a single session lasted.

Conversion: An activity that gets completed by a user, that's important to the success of your business. Example: Completed sign up to your website newsletter.

Conversion Rate: The number of conversions divided by the number of total clicks that can be tracked to a conversion during the same time period. Example: If you had 50 conversions from 1,000 clicks, your conversion rate would be 5%, since 50 ÷ 1,000 = 5%.

Goal: A goal represents a completed activity, called a conversion, that contributes to the success of your business. Example: Making a purchase (for an ecommerce site), completing a game level (for a mobile gaming app), or submitting a contact information form (for a marketing or lead generation site).

Goal Value: When you set up a goal, you have the option of assigning a monetary amount to the conversion. Each time the goal is completed by a user, this amount is recorded and then added together and seen in your reports as the Goal Value.

Goal Completion: Gets counted every time a goal is competed. Example: If you set up a goal which gets triggered every time the contact form gets submitted, this metrics will count the amount of times the form was submitted over a selected period of time.

Goal Conversions: When there is an exchange of information that results in a URL destination such as a ‘Thank You’ page or confirmation page. The only way a visitor can get to those pages is by going through the entire customer process, hence leading to a goal conversion. Example: Leads, trial signups, newsletter sign-ups, white paper downloads, product purchases, and ebook downloads.

Goal Conversion Rate: The number of goal conversions divided by the number of total clicks that can be tracked to a goal conversion during the same time period. Example: If you had 50 goal conversions from 1,000 clicks, your goal conversion rate would be 5%, since 50 ÷ 1,000 = 5%.

% Sessions: Measured by the percentage of time a user is active on your website or app. A new session gets counted when a user is inactive for 30 minutes or more. Any interaction within the 30 minutes, even if the user leaves the website and comes back, will count towards the original session percentage.

% Pageviews: Indicates the percentage of total pages loaded or reloaded in a browser. It's a metric defined as the percentage of total number of pages viewed.

Landing Pages: Pages where users entered your website during a session.

Events: Google Analytics uses events to track user interactions with content on your website. Examples: Downloads, mobile ad clicks, gadgets, Flash elements, AJAX embedded elements, and video plays.

Transactions: Get counted whenever a successful purchase is made on the website. More than one transactions can be completed during one session.

Transaction Revenue: Total revenue from your ecommerce transaction which may include tax and shipping.

Transaction Tax: Specifies the total tax of the transaction.

Local Transaction Shipping: Specifies the total shipping cost of the transaction.

Source / Medium: Dimension that combines the dimensions Source and Medium.

Source: Where the traffic came from. Example: From a search engine.

Medium: The general category the source fall under: Example: Source search engine traffic has various categories namely organic search (organic), cost-per-click paid search (cpc), web referral (referral) and it’s important to distinguish the type of traffic.

 

Types of Traffic:

All Traffic: Includes all total for all traffic types.

Direct: Direct traffic includes a wide variety of sources. The most common sources are when a user typed the domain directly into their browser or accessed your site through a bookmark. However, whenever Google Analytics cannot determine the source of the traffic, it gets pooled into Direct Traffic. It may include:

  • Accessing a link from an email.
  • Accessing a link from a PDF document or Microsoft Office
  • Accessing the site from a shortened URL (depending on the URL shortener)
  • Accessing a link via a mobile social media app like Twitter or Facebook.
  • Accessing a non-secure (http) site from a link on a secure (https) site.
  • Accessing a site from organic search, in some instances, will end up being reported as direct traffic because of a browser issue.

Organic Search: Traffic that originates from non-paid search engine results pages.

Email: Traffic that can be identified by Google Analytics as having originated from clicking a link in an email.

Referral: Traffic which originates from the links on other websites, clicked by users to arrive on your website.

(Other): Refers to untagged paid traffic sources other than Adwords or Adsense and could include social paid traffic like Facebook or Twitter Ads.

Paid Search: Traffic that has been identified by Google Analytics as paid search advertising through either a tag, or automatically.

Adroll: Retargeting advertising platform.

Social: Traffic arriving at your site from Social Media websites.

Display: Any traffic coming to your website from a display marketing channel.

 

Updated on 11 April 2016